CNC Machining Blog - Tips and Tricks for Machinists

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Buying a CNC Lathe? Here's What to Know and Consider

Mike Cope Wed, Jan 22, 2014
Buying a CNC Lathe? Here's What to Know and Consider

When purchasing a CNC lathe, there are several questions to ask yourself before you begin the process. Some of these questions will be quite obvious: how much axis travel do I need? What size chuck should I look for? How many tool stations are on the turret? What is the spindle bore size? Etc.

However, there are other specifications that are just as important but not always so obvious: what is the maximum swing distance that my work will require? What is the maximum turning diameter necessary for my family of parts? What kind of spindle horsepower and torque will my type of work consume? The first set of questions above is relatively easy to answer, but the second group requires a better understanding of lathes in general.

5-Axis Machine Purchasing Considerations: Size Does Matter

Mike Cope Fri, Dec 20, 2013
5-Axis Machine Purchasing Considerations: Size Does Matter

There are several things to keep in mind when you are in the market for a new 5-axis machining center. To be successful, you must make sure that the machine will fit all of your needs, not just your current one. Often times the purchase of a 5-axis machine is driven by a particular job or part, and sometimes shops fail to consider the other work they could run on the machine. Remember, size does matter.

The History of Hurco: Part 2. An interview with Mr. Roch

Maggie Smith Fri, Nov 08, 2013

Last week, I posted Part 1 of our History of Hurco video series, where we learned about all of the events—good and bad—that led Mr. Roch to start a business with his boss at the time, Ed Humston. Mr. Roch ended up working in sales for Ed Humston who owned E.L. Humston Company when he quit his job as an industrial engineer at EMPCO in protest of the company president’s, who he believed was making a number of missteps—and his father owned 30 percent of the company, which made the situation even more awkward.

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